Friday, August 1, 2014

Wilderness Trip Leader/Activist/Artists Sought

SEATTLE BASED Wilderness Trip Co-leader August 25- September 10
Teaching Artists who enjoy the outdoors encouraged to apply

Urban Wilderness Works  to restore our communities, cultural and environment by creating access to service-learning projects rooted in social change.
 
Create a safe,fun, memorable, team experience for urban youth experiencing the great outdoors for the first time! We serve youth of African, Asian, Latino and Native descent who have decided to earn credit for school by building trails on public lands. 
 
Immediate opening for summer wilderness trip co-leader with a current WFR or WFA certification. You must be available August 17-19 for staff training and August 20 & 21 for pre-trip orientation with youth and August 25- September 10 for the backcountry overnight trip. September 11, we will de-issue the gear. Wilderness Works™, a program of the Urban Wilderness Works, offers 6 youth, ages 18-24 an opportunity to earn service-learning hours and a $250 education award upon completion.

As an adult trip co-leader you are responsible for: Daily planning and logistics while on course; risk management; youth development; working with land management agencies and partners to meet trail building and environmental restoration standards; youth supervision; sharing in daily camp duties, included but not limited to, cooking, camp clean-up, gathering water. Participate actively in risk assessment, recreational planning, gear and safety protocols. Creating a fun, memorable, team experience to help youth develop leadership and work skills through experiential learning and arts reflection!

Course description(s):

17-day course
Mandatory pre-trip days August 17-19 staff training and August 20 & 21 youth orientation. Trip dates August 25-September 10. Post trip day, September 11.  North Cascades National Park, WA on Ross Lake. 10 days of trail building projects led by National Parks staff. We pack all gear with students the day before the trip. The program includes the arts and will encourage youth to engage their creativity through writing, drawing, spoken word, and journaling.

Requirements:
  • Must be available to be away for the duration of the trip. August 17-19 is staff training and orientation. Expect long days including early morning travel to hikes.
  • Personal experience or professional experience, hiking, backpacking, and camping.
  • Experience working with youth from diverse backgrounds
  • A demonstrated interest/experience with social and environmental justice concerns.
  • A demonstrated interest/experience in using arts for reflection or a willingness to learn and lead arts activities.
  • Demonstrated interest/experience in one or more of the following: outdoor living, hiking, camping, and backpacking.
  • Outdoor work experience such as trail maintenance, restoration work, landscaping or other.
  • Must pass criminal background check and complete medical exam.
  • Certifications: Wilderness First Responder or Wilderness First Aid.
  • Compensation: $1,700- $2,100 DOE (food and tent lodging included) and staff training.
 TO APPLY: Send resume and cover letter to admin@urbanwildernessproject.org
Immediate opening. Position open until filled. LGBTQ and people of color encouraged to apply.

Tuesday, June 3, 2014

Homophobia’s Hidden Carbon Count | Orion Magazine

Homophobia’s Hidden Carbon Count | Orion Magazine

So, this is the thing--my story, told above is just one of hundreds. Do the math on all the reasons that women don't take the bus at night and add that to the need to put one aspect of your physical safety above another. The pollution that is created by driving instead of using the bus ends up disproportionately impacting me and other women, low-income folks and kids living near raods.



The carbon count is part of the web. The one most visible.



~Jourdan

Tuesday, April 1, 2014

EPA Study Shows Poverty Is a Risk Factor for Heart Disease | Environmental Justice

EPA Study Shows Poverty Is a Risk Factor for Heart Disease | Environmental Justice



So, this is not new news but it does add to what I think is important.  We use the term "at risk"  when talking about endangered species of other living creatures. They are "at risk" of extinction. That is what ESA is intended to keep from happening. As you know,  my question is " R U Endangered?" What I mean by that is what this article highlights. If you are from a group of people that is an "at risk" group for premature death linked to environmental hazards then why shouldn't you be protected as an endangered person?



Join me at the Panama Hotel Tea House in Seattle for a community conversation. Share your ideas. MONDAY, APRIL 21 @ 6:30 pm

607 S Main St, Seattle, WA 98104

Sunday, March 16, 2014

Warning Signs: How Pesticides Harm the Young Brain | The Nation

Warning Signs: How Pesticides Harm the Young Brain | The Nation



Environmental Protections exist for Endangered Species when they are on the brink of extinction. What will we do to protect our habitat ( water, food and shelter) before individuals, their families and their neighborhoods are on the brink of irreversible catastrophe?



It is is important to find out what puts you and the people like you at risk and then organize and demand policy and practice changes to protect you and the other humans you love, know and don't know.

Monday, February 3, 2014

At Risk | Orion Magazine

At Risk | Orion Magazine

"Despite my comfort, I am acutely aware that I am at-risk"
Everyday I see myself crossing the intersections of race, culture, and environment. I have built an organization and my work at Urban Wilderness Project around magnifying those intersections because doing so gives me hope. It is clear that our fates are tangled. I hope that understanding how will move us to creating the change in our own lives that will benefit the whole.

Thursday, April 18, 2013

Here is a little background on BPA.

The advice is like saying air quality is terrible today, stay inside. Hmm, how can I get to work? Buy groceries without breathing? While this might be a bit of hyperbole, it is pretty hard to avoid BPA. I have been working on it for a few years.

Oh, I know...what if the people in charge of our health said the risks were too high for long term public health protections? It might be easier to avoid if it wasn't everywhere.

http://www.niehs.nih.gov/health/topics/agents/sya-bpa/

BPA levels in fetal livers higher than adult exposures. — Environmental Health News

BPA levels in fetal livers higher than adult exposures. — Environmental Health News

So, not all of us can have our blood tested and prove our exposures to an onslaught of chemicals we can not avoid, but we can count on there presence in our bodies. The thing is it is a slow poisoning. At the level of daily exposures this chemicals does not produce acute symptoms or if it does we are not yet aware of the link. How much chronic illness can we tolerate? Obesity? We'd like to just blame that on the fast food, but we are learning that chemicals are disrupting the way our bodies function. Couple these stress factors in your body's eco-system with other stresses and estimate your risk of pre-mature death. That is the technical term for what we say at funerals, " She was young." Or, really only 58?

How many legs must be lost to the quiet bomb of diabetes? The fuse of endocrine disruption is lit. It has been for a long time. In some communities, where people have been disproportionally eating canned foods, the lining of which is BPA, how are the rates for obesity and diabetes? We have been spending a long time looking at what is in the can as unhealthy, now we know it is also the can itself.

How many generations of people are already walking around with livers that were exposed to BPA in the womb? What will their health outcomes be later and how will we know which chemical to attribute it to? Oh, that's right, we won't because there are lots of endocrine disrupting chemicals we are exposed to daily. It's a win/win for the those who do not have to take financial responsibility for the health crisis.

What if they had were required to mitigate the cost for the use of their product in support of individuals who consume their products? Like in England where there is a fee for excessive packing materials. Companies have to pay for the disposal.  Hmm. Now there is an economic incentive.